Garden design inspiration

After the technical and strategic post How to plan a garden, I think it is time to let down our hair and day dream about how your garden could look and feel. This is why gardening is so great, you have the power to create a beautiful space and environment all by planting and caring for seeds! img_4849

My friend and garden muse, Tracey aka The Fake Farmgirl, inspires me to think creatively and to move outside the lines to create a beautiful, lush garden. In my 2016 reflections, I stated that my goal in 2017 is to get more colorful and experimental. To get my juices flowing, Tracey was gracious enough to share how she thinks about garden design and planning. The best part, she doesn’t overthink it. She pairs her garden knowledge with her vision and creates a space that is brimming with life. dsc_0040

Megan: When you first started gardening, did you have a vision for how you wanted the garden to look? 

Tracey: So when we moved into our house, 4 years ago, we had these hideous Junipers that took up 80% of our back yard. My poor husband was tasked with chopping them down and when he was done we had this gaping hole in our yard…And my journey began. He built me a few raised beds and I went to town. I started to look on Pinterest every day to get inspiration and became obsessed with Potager gardens. Potager is French for kitchen garden. I found that most of these gardens have a blend of veggies, flowers, and herbs that commingle to create an aesthetically pleasing space. There is also often a use of structures to create visual appeal. I love the idea because it allows me to create a beautiful space in my garden.

Megan: What does your dream garden look like and why?

Tracey: I hate dirt. I think that a garden teeming with life is the best use of space. My dream garden is alive with ornamentals, food, flowers and structures all co habituating and creating a space that invites people in. there are also a few chickens in my dream garden lol…img_5408

Megan: How do you plan your garden? Based on what you want to eat? How you want it to look? 

Tracey: All of that. I think about the veggies first, then I try to think about companion plants. What bugs are going to attack my veggies and what can I plant nearby to try to prevent infestations or detour pests? I love Borage so I always put a ton next to squash to encourage pollinators to visit. Sage near my brussel sprouts and kale to keep cabbage moths away. I also think about where I can put structures or grow vines… I want green everywhere.

Megan: Do you draw a visual of what you want your garden to look like and then plant it? How do you time everything so that it is all blooming at the same time?

Tracey: Lol no, I should. I really just go for it.

Megan: How do you know what flowers, veggies, and herbs to pair together? Do you plant all of these in your beds or just focus on veggies?

Tracey: Everything goes in my beds, I read and take classes on companions. I focus on the veggies and what is best to plant near and away. img_5409

Megan: Do you suggest any MUST-HAVE veggies, flowers, herbs that we should plant in our garden beds? And why?

Tracey: I’m really into Pineapple Sage – I love how its red flowers pop amongst my brassicas, and it is such a hummingbird attracter! I also love Nasturtium. Be careful though, it ATTRACTS aphids so it can back fire. Plant it near tomatoes and the two will live in harmony. I’m also really into Borage, I’d try that if you haven’t, around squash. It’s a must-have. It re seeds so you will only need to plant it once. I’m also into artichokes, I like to let one bloom. I just planted leeks too, and plan to let them flower. img_1060

Just the name “Pineapple Sage” makes me feel all warm and fuzzy with excitement to grow plants. Yum! Beyond thinking about a space overflowing with vegetables, herbs, and fruit, you can also think about creating spaces in your garden where you can relax. For example, my childhood garden was built around a brick patio where my family enjoyed dinner together all summer long. There were two entrances to the garden, both trellised and covered in honeysuckle and clematis. It was dreamy. Your garden can be an outdoor extension of your home and a place of inspiration and peace. Dream big!

My 2016 garden. The plan is to add a lot more color in 2017!dsc_0040

A few months ago, Tracey also shared her insight about natural pest control in the garden, check it out.

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A year in review

This last year was a big one. I gave birth to my first child and I decided to leave my corporate job. It was a LOT of change, really fast. It was the first year, in a long time, in which I felt incredibly present. This sudden lifestyle change and entirely new focus gave me the ability to think more creatively. Ultimately enabling me to tap even deeper into my love for gardening. Lucky me! I learned a lot this  year, but even more, my passion and interest in edible gardening GREW big time! img_5666

When I think of ONE word to describe my gardening life in 2016, it is “productive”. I did a much better job at planning. I put seeds in the ground early enough to take advantage of growing food all year long. I invested the time to thin, weed, and fertilize, resulting in productive and healthy plants. When I think of ONE word to describe what I am aiming for in 2017, it is “diversity”. megan-11

Now that I better understand garden planning, timing, and growing cycles, it is time to have a little more fun! I tend to grow what I know I will eat i.e. what I can find at the grocery store. How boring. In 2017 I want to try growing vegetables, fruits, herbs, and flowers that are new to me and my family. I typically dedicate the space in my raised beds to edible food only. In 2017 I hope to create a larger ecosystem of vegetables, herbs, and flowers grown next to one another. Thanks to The Fake Farmgirl who opened my eyes to the concept of a Potager garden in which flowers, herbs, vegetables, and fruits are intermingled. Ultimately, creating a stronger ecosystem to pollenate, fertilize, and protect against unwanted pests. 2017 is the year of a more diverse, colorful, and experimental garden.

Last year at this time, I documented my key accomplishments and lessons learned. THIS IS A MUST to get closer to the garden that you want to have. I am happy to report that I put my learnings into action in 2016. So here I go again.

Key Accomplishments

  • Grew more of everything. I grew more vegetables, herbs, fruit, and flowers than the year before. This is because I actually planned and most importantly understood the timing of when I needed to get seeds and bulbs into the ground. To do this, I suggest having one or two really great gardening books on hand. Food Grown Right, In Your Backyard lists out what you need to do in the garden each month. Read the instructions on seed packages. I am embarrassed to say that I have not done this and then the seeds or bulbs don’t sprout because I planted too deep, didn’t soak bulbs, or planted at the wrong time. This seems so simple but is often overlooked.
    • Timing: directly planted seeds for my spring garden by end of March , summer garden in early May, Fall garden by end of July, and last planting beginning of September.
  • Had beautiful roses from May – October. We bought and planted bare root roses in February and enjoyed roses starting in May! Visit your local nursery for bare root roses that will do well in your environment.
  • Expanded my gardening community and knowledge. Through this blog, social channels, and reaching out to gardeners within my local community, I have created a network of people that inspire me to grow food, eat real food, and treat Mother Earth with love and care. I look forward to continuing to grow and connect with this community in 2017.

 Lessons learned

  • I want to and can grow more. This will require another raised bed. I plan to build this bed in January to have it ready to roll for planting in March (blog post to come).
  • Grow more herbs. I learned how to air dry herbs this year and it was a success. These were great holiday gifts and I now have a container full of flavor from my own backyard. I definitely want to do this again in Fall 2017 and hope to have more herbs on hand to make twice as much. My two favorite herbs to air dry are Oregano and Thyme. dsc_0113
  • Grow more flowers. I said this last year. I did grow more flowers, but not nearly as many as I could have. Not only can these help create healthier vegetables, but who doesn’t want fresh flowers in their house all year long? I’m all about these flower recommendations from Seattle Urban Farm Company. img_4596
  • Onions need to be started as transplants in January. I directly seeded my onion seeds into the garden in late March. This didn’t work. Because I did not read any directions about growing onions, I just assumed I could directly plant the seeds into the garden in spring. It is best to plant onion transplants into the garden in late March and allow them to grow for 5-6 months before harvesting.
  • Sungold tomatoes rock! We had great success with this tomato variety and they are delicious. I personally like planting my tomato plants in large pots because they are easier for me to manage and don’t take up a lot of space in my raised bed.
  • Plant winter squash in the spring. I completely missed the boat on planting winter squash this year. You can direct seed winter squash and I will plan to do this by end of May. I hope to grow New England Pie Pumpkin and Honey Bear Acorn Squash.
  • Grow a “lettuce salad mix”. I love growing lettuce, I eat a lot of it and it is easy to grow in the PNW. This is the first year that I grew a lettuce mix. Not only was it fun to have a variety of lettuce leaves, but it also thrived in the garden. DSC_0022
  • Plant a fall garden. This year I was diligent about getting one more round of seeds into the ground at the beginning of September. This was well worth the effort and resulted in vegetables through January. It is such a treat to harvest carrots, beets, leeks, kale, and swiss chard on a cold, dark evening in the winter. dsc_0113
  • Reference a few key gardening resources. As mentioned before, it is so important to have a book or two on hand that makes it easier for you to know when to plant what. These are my go to gardening resources:

What has been your biggest learning in 2016? What is one thing you want to do in your garden in 2017?

I want to give a special THANK YOU to all of you who read my blog and support my gardening habits. Gardening would not be nearly as fun without those of you that help me learn, dig in the dirt, harvest, and enjoy the food!

Cheers to community and spreading the good gardening word in 2017!

With gratitude,

Megan megan