Meet Sarah, garden to table made simple

A big part of growing an edible garden is eating the food that you grow. This can also be the most challenging part. It requires attention to the garden, time to harvest and clean, and then preparation of the food.

Starting now, preparing your harvested food no longer needs to be a challenge. It can be easy and delicious with inspiration and guidance from my friend Sarah Adler, Founder of Simply Real Health. Sarah is dedicated to helping people eat in a healthy and simple way that happily works in the context of daily life, not against it. She takes the mystery out of eating real, whole food and makes it a lifestyle. Her cookbook and blog not only make it easy for me to turn my harvest into a meal, but inspire the vegetables and fruits that I choose to grow in the garden.

Processed with VSCO with f2 preset

 

I had the opportunity to ask Sarah a series of questions about incorporating eating real food into your daily life. Let’s be honest, it is hard enough to find the time to grow a garden, let alone harvest and prepare the food. Sarah was kind enough to provide advice and tools that make it easy to whip up your fresh harvest. Plus, learn how she developed Simply Real Health and what she believes is the key to making a healthy lifestyle an intuitive part of our daily lives.

Megan: What is your advice for taking the intimidation out of cooking food? How can it feel less overwhelming and time consuming?

roasted-carrots-with-honey-cilantro-lime-3

Sarah: Oh my gosh. YES. Healthy cooking has a weird connotation—that it’s either super complicated with obscure ingredients, or that it tastes so boring and bland. It doesn’t have to be either way. Honestly, if you start with fresh and good quality ingredients, it becomes more about slightly enhancing them, than trying to cover the flavor up.

I would say start with roasting a vegetable. All you need is a baking sheet, olive oil, good sea salt and some pepper at 400. Actually—you can cook MOST things this way, so don’t over complicate it. Butter/olive oil and sea salt and pepper are often times all you need to elevate most things.

Megan: Do you have any tips for making it easy to whip up something delicious with your fresh harvest without having to go to the grocery store?

Sarah: Yes! Make sure your pantry is intentionally stocked well. I don’t mean packed with random things—I mean just some basics. Butter, olive oil, sea salt and pepper, maybe some Italian herbs, some quinoa or brown rice, a few cans or jars of dried beans, organic sausages or chicken breasts in the freezer, and a good block of parmesan. Maybe some eggs and a harissa paste or Dijon mustard, and you can literally make 6 different kinds of meals there, with your fresh produce as the star. carinaskrobeckiphotography_simplyrealhealth4-0_536

Megan: What advice would you give to those who love real food, but struggle with finding the time and energy to prepare meals each week?

Sarah: Well, if you can find 1 hour to think about your food each week- whether it’s getting yourself to the store to buy healthy pre-made stuff, or to keep your pantry stocked so you can whip up some simple things that you know work well for your lifestyle, you can work a lot of magic.

But you have to have the value of eating well first. And the value that you are worth it- worth feeling great, worth investing in yourself. Because even that ONE HOUR of time can be the center domino that shifts and changes so much else in your week for the better. It starts there—not the other way around that everything else in life comes first, then food as an afterthought.

Because it impacts so much else, it has to be something you dedicate at least 60 minutes to. And it doesn’t have to be cooking huge meals from scratch everyday. It’s just the intention of feeding yourself well, whatever that means to you.

Otherwise, that Netflix marathon or those trashy magazines, or that instagram feed scrolling will always sneak themselves in. We all have the time, it’s a just a matter of making food a little bit higher on your priority list.  carinaskrobeckiphotography_simplyrealhealth4-0_441

Megan: Why did you write the Simply Real Health Cookbook?

Sarah: Well, two reasons really. One, I’m a cookbook lover, and I have so many- they’re beautiful and so soothing for me to read and wander through. But. I started to realized that I never really cooked from them—they’d sit there most of the time, because all of the recipes were either a) healthy and required 15 different ingredients and spices (and ain’t no one got time for that on a busy weekday), or b) they were “simple” and “quick” recipes that were all pasta or flour based. And as much as it would be nice to feel amazing eating pasta every single night, I knew my body well enough to know that wasn’t going to fly either.

So, I wrote the book as a solution, to my own problem really. That I am a small business owner first- and thus my days are totally packed to the brim, but I wasn’t willing to sacrifice my health and energy on food that was just quick and easy and non-intentional.

Because Simply Real Health started as a food blog, I knew all the recipes that people loved and commented and shared all the time, so the book became my little gift to them- a way to have everything in one place, beautifully styled, and a true guidebook into HOW you make healthy eating and living doable, easy and delicious (all at the same time).

blueprint-brunch

Megan: What do people need to make eating real food an intuitive part of their everyday life?

Sarah: A basic understanding of what real food is vs. what is marketed to us as healthy food. The two are wildly different. And, starting to notice how connected your energy, mood and hunger are to what you eat. Once you realize how powerful food actually is to the things that matter most in your life, it becomes a little bit more motivating and encouraging to want to eat well.

Megan: Why did you start a career and business in teaching healthy lifestyles?

Sarah: Because truly, in this country, we are never taught how to eat in a way that creates a balanced and joyful relationship to food. In so many other countries, food is this centerpoint of a beautiful and celebrated life. Here in the US, the only way most of us learn about food is through marketing or through diets, which creates a terrible relationship to food, and it doesn’t have to be that way.

Knowledge is power. And in the world of fad diets, extreme workout plans, social media, it’s so easy to get lost in all the clutter. I want to help people clear that clutter and confusion and see that it’s actually really easy (and such a better, happier way to live your life) if you can actually KNOW and appreciate good food, in all its beauty.

All of this comes from my own personal experience of course—I use to be obsessed with eating healthy, and counting my calories, measuring carbs, tracking my workouts, etc. But I had a TERRIBLE RELATIONSHIP with food that I didn’t realize was taking over so much of my life. Real food started the journey for me out of that more limited way of thinking and my life has changed because of it.simplyrealhealth-167

Megan: What is your greatest learning from helping hundreds of people to live a healthier lifestyle and eat real food?

Sarah: That getting clear once and for all about what healthy food actually is (instead of what we’re taught it is by the media) is the best gift you could ever give yourself- physically, mentally and emotionally. It changes everything.

Megan: What is your favorite edible plant to grow and why?

Sarah: I am currently working on my gardening skills, and so far, mint makes me feel like a gardening queen. Isn’t that because it’s the easiest to grow? So whatever that says about me. Ha! But I do love it—fresh mint tea, in greek salads, fun cocktails, marinades, etc. Give me all the mint. And the basil, although I eat it too fast for the poor plant to keep up. I could bathe in it.

roasted-squash-kale-salad-2

Megan: What is your most favorite recipe to make?

Sarah: I love the Pesto Kale Salad from the cookbook. I will never ever get sick of making or eating that salad- it transforms kale into this hearty, delicious and filling meal. And the process of making it—rubbing each leaf to help soften it, smelling the basil whirling around in the blender.. ah it’s heavenly! Not to mention it gets better the next day, so it is always such a great use of time for more than one meal alone.

Megan: What is your favorite food?

Sarah: I love mezze night. Like, lots of little jars of things, sauces, crackers, olives, good cheeses, smoked salmon, salami, nuts. AH, I die. You get a little bit of everything, and goes so well with a glass of wine, literally in any season. That’s my dream. Or, a huge salad and lamb burger on top.carinaskrobeckiphotography_simplyrealhealth4-0_455

Megan: If you were given a few more hours in the day, what would you choose to do?

Sarah: Oo, I’d do a yoga class or take a luxuriously long walk or read, or cozy up by the fire, or find a farmers market (so I could buy myself flowers) ha! Such girly things, but all of them give me fuel and make me feel relaxed and inspired.

Megan: What resources do you provide through Simply Real Health that make it easier to cook and prepare your own meals?

Sarah: The cookbook, for sure. There’s over 150 easy and healthy (and naturally gluten-free) recipes in there, every single one of them with a picture, and most of them with 5 ingredients or less.

I also write seasonal meal plans every quarter that help people learn to efficiently shop and cook and eat healthy delicious real food, all in under 3 hours a week.

carinaskrobeckiphotography_simplyrealhealth4-0_436Then there’s the online Food Academy, which is like a 3 week masterclass school in real food: what to pay attention to, what to ignore, how to navigate the store, cooking, eating out, dinners, traveling, and just REAL LIFE stuff, with a more balanced and joyful approach to being healthy.

I also work with people one on one, speak to a lot of different groups, teach cooking classes once a month or so, and run a big 8 week group coaching program twice a year. (all the details are over here).

Megan: Are there resources you recommend for making it easy to cook real food?

Sarah: Yes, there are so many!

I love Sara and Hugh Forte of Sprouted Kitchen (both their books and blog are amazing)

Dishing Up The Dirt by Andrea Bemis is such a beautiful farm to table food blog

Podcast wise, Shawn Stevenson of The Model Health Show is my all time favorite, as well as the Cherry Bombe Radio Podcast (from Cherry Bombe Magazine that celebrates women and food—another of my favorites).

I also have a list of my fav Seattle food spots here on the blog, and a list of my favorite books and resources here.

Megan: What is next for you?

Sarah: Oh gosh. So many fun things are coming, most of which are still under wraps right now. But, more than ever I feel so excited about being able to help more people address and create a more joyful, longterm and sustainable relationship to food, without ever having to diet or be continually doing program after program. I don’t think it’s talked about enough—but we all have a relationship to food, and when it can be a more positive thing in life, everything else lights up even more. I love seeing that light in other people, and feel so honored to play just a tiny role in that journey for someone.simplyrealhealth-170

Thank you Sarah for sharing this wealth of information, resources, and inspiration! Be sure to follow Sarah and check out Simply Real Health.

And stock the pantry with those key staples so that your fresh harvest can shine all season long.

Photography by Jasmine Pulley and Carina Skrobecki

Advertisements

Garden design inspiration

After the technical and strategic post How to plan a garden, I think it is time to let down our hair and day dream about how your garden could look and feel. This is why gardening is so great, you have the power to create a beautiful space and environment all by planting and caring for seeds! img_4849

My friend and garden muse, Tracey aka The Fake Farmgirl, inspires me to think creatively and to move outside the lines to create a beautiful, lush garden. In my 2016 reflections, I stated that my goal in 2017 is to get more colorful and experimental. To get my juices flowing, Tracey was gracious enough to share how she thinks about garden design and planning. The best part, she doesn’t overthink it. She pairs her garden knowledge with her vision and creates a space that is brimming with life. dsc_0040

Megan: When you first started gardening, did you have a vision for how you wanted the garden to look? 

Tracey: So when we moved into our house, 4 years ago, we had these hideous Junipers that took up 80% of our back yard. My poor husband was tasked with chopping them down and when he was done we had this gaping hole in our yard…And my journey began. He built me a few raised beds and I went to town. I started to look on Pinterest every day to get inspiration and became obsessed with Potager gardens. Potager is French for kitchen garden. I found that most of these gardens have a blend of veggies, flowers, and herbs that commingle to create an aesthetically pleasing space. There is also often a use of structures to create visual appeal. I love the idea because it allows me to create a beautiful space in my garden.

Megan: What does your dream garden look like and why?

Tracey: I hate dirt. I think that a garden teeming with life is the best use of space. My dream garden is alive with ornamentals, food, flowers and structures all co habituating and creating a space that invites people in. there are also a few chickens in my dream garden lol…img_5408

Megan: How do you plan your garden? Based on what you want to eat? How you want it to look? 

Tracey: All of that. I think about the veggies first, then I try to think about companion plants. What bugs are going to attack my veggies and what can I plant nearby to try to prevent infestations or detour pests? I love Borage so I always put a ton next to squash to encourage pollinators to visit. Sage near my brussel sprouts and kale to keep cabbage moths away. I also think about where I can put structures or grow vines… I want green everywhere.

Megan: Do you draw a visual of what you want your garden to look like and then plant it? How do you time everything so that it is all blooming at the same time?

Tracey: Lol no, I should. I really just go for it.

Megan: How do you know what flowers, veggies, and herbs to pair together? Do you plant all of these in your beds or just focus on veggies?

Tracey: Everything goes in my beds, I read and take classes on companions. I focus on the veggies and what is best to plant near and away. img_5409

Megan: Do you suggest any MUST-HAVE veggies, flowers, herbs that we should plant in our garden beds? And why?

Tracey: I’m really into Pineapple Sage – I love how its red flowers pop amongst my brassicas, and it is such a hummingbird attracter! I also love Nasturtium. Be careful though, it ATTRACTS aphids so it can back fire. Plant it near tomatoes and the two will live in harmony. I’m also really into Borage, I’d try that if you haven’t, around squash. It’s a must-have. It re seeds so you will only need to plant it once. I’m also into artichokes, I like to let one bloom. I just planted leeks too, and plan to let them flower. img_1060

Just the name “Pineapple Sage” makes me feel all warm and fuzzy with excitement to grow plants. Yum! Beyond thinking about a space overflowing with vegetables, herbs, and fruit, you can also think about creating spaces in your garden where you can relax. For example, my childhood garden was built around a brick patio where my family enjoyed dinner together all summer long. There were two entrances to the garden, both trellised and covered in honeysuckle and clematis. It was dreamy. Your garden can be an outdoor extension of your home and a place of inspiration and peace. Dream big!

My 2016 garden. The plan is to add a lot more color in 2017!dsc_0040

A few months ago, Tracey also shared her insight about natural pest control in the garden, check it out.

How to plan a garden

Deciding what vegetables, herbs, fruits, and flowers you want to grow can be exciting and overwhelming. It is fun to think about a garden full of life, beauty, and food. But it is daunting to figure out when and where to plant. img_7763

Since the goal of this blog is to make it easy to grow food, I am going to try to keep this really simple and digestible. This is a long post, but hopefully easy to skim for the information you need. 

I am embarrassed to admit that this is the first year I have been this organized. I have never planned using an Excel spreadsheet, implemented crop rotation, or even considered the variety of crops.

I say all of this because YOU CAN GROW FOOD AS LONG AS YOU 1.) Get the seeds in the ground when they should be planted 2.) Tend to your garden. HOWEVER, if you spend the extra hour or two to strategize and document your plan, it will make it easier to plan year-over-year, you will yield more food, and it will be possible to make the most of the growing season.

Disclaimer: Everything in this post is based on what has worked for me personally. I am not saying it is the perfect way to plan. Also, like everything, you can get even more strategic and organized, but I am trying to keep it fairly simple.

Here we go!

If you use Excel, I strongly suggest using it for garden planning. You can also use an “Excel” Google Doc. This will allow you to easily make changes, stay organized, and save to reference year-over-year. Paper and pencil work great too. My Dad did want me to title this post “Garden planning for nerds”. 

In this order, plan what crops you will grow and where:

  1. Make a list of the plants yoplantandfamilynamesu want to grow. Consider your available space and what grows best in your region. 
  2. Label each plant with its family name. You will want to plant families together. This will make it easy to decide where to plant each crop and ensure that you rotate these families of crops to control pests and diseases. You can find each crop’s family name online or in a garden book like High-Yield Vegetable Gardening. To learn more about this topic, check out this podcast. Add a column “Family”. For example, broccoli, cabbage, kale, and bok choy are all part of the Brassicaceae family “Brassicas”.
  3. Determine the location you will plant your crops. This is where Excel really comes in handy.
    1. Sort the crops by family name. You want to plant families together.
    2. Choose a bed, trellis, or other location for your crops. Separate crops by bed, container, or other space in yard. I always put my tomatoes in containers because I think they are easier to manage in pots. I have a specific space in the yard with a trellis created for my Peas. I also consider if the crop is an annual or perennial. I prefer not to plant perennials in my raised beds. Perennials come back year after year so I want a location that I can dedicate to that crop. I found a space in my yard next to my back deck for perennial herbs like thyme, oregano, and sage.
    3. Decide what crops will go in which raised bed. Now that you know which crops will be planted in a raised bed, you can plan which crops will go in what bed. plantlocation
      1. Choose one crop and one bed. I started with Garlic because it is already planted in one of my raised beds, bed #1. I will plant the other crops in garlic’s family in that bed, these would be “Alliums” and include leeks and chives.
      2. Determine best companions. I reference this site or a garden book. Alliums (leeks, onions, etc) help Brassicas. So I will add all crops in the Brassicaceae/Brassica family into bed #1. Dill is also helpful to Brassicas, so I will add this to bed #1.
      3. Consider the space a crop needs to grow. I know that squash require a lot of space and room to sprawl. I think my bed #3 is best positioned for squash to sprawl out and over. Squash and beans are good companions so I will add beans to bed #3. Beans are good companions with spinach, swiss chard, and cilantro, all added to bed #3.
      4. What is left? That leaves me with carrots, lettuce, salad greens, arugula, and cucumbers. All will work well together and be put into my remaining bed #2. 
      5. Add flowers. One of my goals this year is to add more color and creativity to my raised beds. For the first year, I am going to plant beneficial flowers in my raised beds. I have added zinnias, calendula, and cosmos into beds #2 and #3. I had room to add them in bed #2 and purposely added to bed #3 to help attract insects to pollenate the squash.
  4. Plan where each crop will be planted within the bed. This will make it quick and easy to actually plant the seeds and transplants in your bed because you already know where to plant. To do this, I also drew my beds in Excel (10 columns wide and 15 columns long for my 10ft x 5ft beds). gardenplanning_inbed
    1. Consider the size of each crop. It is really helpful to make note of the height (short, medium, tall) that each crop will reach at full maturity. There have been so many times when I have planted a tall crop in front of a short crop and the short crop was always too shaded to reach its full potential. Now that you know which crop is going in each bed, you can plan the actual location of the crop in the bed by considering the height of the crop. Plant the taller crops on the north side of the garden or where shorter crops will not be shaded.
    2. How much you want of each crop. If you really love a certain crop, you want to make sure you have plenty of space dedicated to growing that crop. For example, my family loves lettuce, salad greens, spinach, and beans. I want to be sure to dedicate plenty of space to these crops.
    3. The life span of each crop. You need to know how long a plant will take up that space in the garden so that you are always growing something. It is such a bummer when you finish harvesting and have not prepared to replace that space with a new crop. For example, garlic will be harvested in July and that space will be available for a new crop. Decide now what you want to fill that space and can be planted in July/August.

Other Considerations:

  • Determine the month you will plant the seeds or transplant. You can find this information by searching on the internet, on the seed package, or in a garden book like Food Grown Right, In Your Backyard. You can also determine the month by knowing your last frost date. Most Spring crops can be planted after the last frost date. If you are using Excel, add a column and list the “Planting Month”. Some plants can be seeded continually every other week for multiple months. Note this by using “month – month”. So Lettuce can be directly seeded every week/ or every other week from March – September.
  • Consider crop variety. Until this year I did not pay much attention to the variety of crop. I just bought carrot seeds. Then I learned there are varieties that do best in my local environment. This year I am specifically researching the best varieties of each crop or at least documenting the varieties I choose so that I can better document the success of each crop. I love this Encyclopedia Botanica Podcast episode about garden planning and the best 2016 seed varieties.
  • Add a section for “date planted” and “notes“. It is super helpful to keep track of the day you actual planted your seeds/transplants. Also, add a note section for special notes on planting, harvesting, or anything else you want to note for this year or next. gardeningplanning

Please know, from personal experience, it is worth every minute to plan what you will grow and where it will be grown. Once plants starting sprouting, every extra minute you have will be used maintaining, harvesting, and enjoying your garden. You will not have the time or want to spend the time trying to figure out what to plant next and where to plant it.  Plus, when next year roles around, you already have a solid planning foundation in place.

Too much? Probably! I hope this post is helpful. Please share your tips, tricks, and questions in the comment section!

Need help planning your garden? Please contact me to learn more.

A year in review

This last year was a big one. I gave birth to my first child and I decided to leave my corporate job. It was a LOT of change, really fast. It was the first year, in a long time, in which I felt incredibly present. This sudden lifestyle change and entirely new focus gave me the ability to think more creatively. Ultimately enabling me to tap even deeper into my love for gardening. Lucky me! I learned a lot this  year, but even more, my passion and interest in edible gardening GREW big time! img_5666

When I think of ONE word to describe my gardening life in 2016, it is “productive”. I did a much better job at planning. I put seeds in the ground early enough to take advantage of growing food all year long. I invested the time to thin, weed, and fertilize, resulting in productive and healthy plants. When I think of ONE word to describe what I am aiming for in 2017, it is “diversity”. megan-11

Now that I better understand garden planning, timing, and growing cycles, it is time to have a little more fun! I tend to grow what I know I will eat i.e. what I can find at the grocery store. How boring. In 2017 I want to try growing vegetables, fruits, herbs, and flowers that are new to me and my family. I typically dedicate the space in my raised beds to edible food only. In 2017 I hope to create a larger ecosystem of vegetables, herbs, and flowers grown next to one another. Thanks to The Fake Farmgirl who opened my eyes to the concept of a Potager garden in which flowers, herbs, vegetables, and fruits are intermingled. Ultimately, creating a stronger ecosystem to pollenate, fertilize, and protect against unwanted pests. 2017 is the year of a more diverse, colorful, and experimental garden.

Last year at this time, I documented my key accomplishments and lessons learned. THIS IS A MUST to get closer to the garden that you want to have. I am happy to report that I put my learnings into action in 2016. So here I go again.

Key Accomplishments

  • Grew more of everything. I grew more vegetables, herbs, fruit, and flowers than the year before. This is because I actually planned and most importantly understood the timing of when I needed to get seeds and bulbs into the ground. To do this, I suggest having one or two really great gardening books on hand. Food Grown Right, In Your Backyard lists out what you need to do in the garden each month. Read the instructions on seed packages. I am embarrassed to say that I have not done this and then the seeds or bulbs don’t sprout because I planted too deep, didn’t soak bulbs, or planted at the wrong time. This seems so simple but is often overlooked.
    • Timing: directly planted seeds for my spring garden by end of March , summer garden in early May, Fall garden by end of July, and last planting beginning of September.
  • Had beautiful roses from May – October. We bought and planted bare root roses in February and enjoyed roses starting in May! Visit your local nursery for bare root roses that will do well in your environment.
  • Expanded my gardening community and knowledge. Through this blog, social channels, and reaching out to gardeners within my local community, I have created a network of people that inspire me to grow food, eat real food, and treat Mother Earth with love and care. I look forward to continuing to grow and connect with this community in 2017.

 Lessons learned

  • I want to and can grow more. This will require another raised bed. I plan to build this bed in January to have it ready to roll for planting in March (blog post to come).
  • Grow more herbs. I learned how to air dry herbs this year and it was a success. These were great holiday gifts and I now have a container full of flavor from my own backyard. I definitely want to do this again in Fall 2017 and hope to have more herbs on hand to make twice as much. My two favorite herbs to air dry are Oregano and Thyme. dsc_0113
  • Grow more flowers. I said this last year. I did grow more flowers, but not nearly as many as I could have. Not only can these help create healthier vegetables, but who doesn’t want fresh flowers in their house all year long? I’m all about these flower recommendations from Seattle Urban Farm Company. img_4596
  • Onions need to be started as transplants in January. I directly seeded my onion seeds into the garden in late March. This didn’t work. Because I did not read any directions about growing onions, I just assumed I could directly plant the seeds into the garden in spring. It is best to plant onion transplants into the garden in late March and allow them to grow for 5-6 months before harvesting.
  • Sungold tomatoes rock! We had great success with this tomato variety and they are delicious. I personally like planting my tomato plants in large pots because they are easier for me to manage and don’t take up a lot of space in my raised bed.
  • Plant winter squash in the spring. I completely missed the boat on planting winter squash this year. You can direct seed winter squash and I will plan to do this by end of May. I hope to grow New England Pie Pumpkin and Honey Bear Acorn Squash.
  • Grow a “lettuce salad mix”. I love growing lettuce, I eat a lot of it and it is easy to grow in the PNW. This is the first year that I grew a lettuce mix. Not only was it fun to have a variety of lettuce leaves, but it also thrived in the garden. DSC_0022
  • Plant a fall garden. This year I was diligent about getting one more round of seeds into the ground at the beginning of September. This was well worth the effort and resulted in vegetables through January. It is such a treat to harvest carrots, beets, leeks, kale, and swiss chard on a cold, dark evening in the winter. dsc_0113
  • Reference a few key gardening resources. As mentioned before, it is so important to have a book or two on hand that makes it easier for you to know when to plant what. These are my go to gardening resources:

What has been your biggest learning in 2016? What is one thing you want to do in your garden in 2017?

I want to give a special THANK YOU to all of you who read my blog and support my gardening habits. Gardening would not be nearly as fun without those of you that help me learn, dig in the dirt, harvest, and enjoy the food!

Cheers to community and spreading the good gardening word in 2017!

With gratitude,

Megan megan

 

 

Meet Hilary – making edible gardening possible for everyone

Do you want to grow food but don’t know where to start? Or maybe you have an edible garden, but like me, still have so many questions. Wherever you are at, one thing holds true, we all need a little guidance, support, and inspiration.

I can’t think of a better way to inspire you than to introduce you to a woman that has motivated and educated me about urban, edible gardening. Meet Hilary Dahl, Co-owner of Seattle Urban Farm Company and Creator of Encyclopedia Botanica Podcast. Not only is she wicked smart about gardening, but she distills the science into an easy guide that makes growing food possible for anyone. Plus, she is a super talented photographer, so don’t forget to follow @SeattleUrbanFarmCo on Instagram to get a daily dose of her amazing photos.hilary-pruning-peas-2

I had the opportunity to ask Hilary a series of questions about how she started her urban farming career, advice and tips for those that want to grow food, and helpful knowledge for those that are already working on their green thumb.  Plus, at the bottom of this post you will find a list of helpful resources from Hilary and Seattle Urban Farm Company and a GIVEAWAY. Enjoy!

Megan: What is your gardening mission?
Hilary: My mission to is make edible gardening accessible for everyone. I try to create content, such as the podcast, blog and social media feed, that help take the mystery out of home food production. Edible gardening is possible for anyone, our goal is to provide resources that empower people to get out there, be successful, and enjoy themselves.summer-harvest

Megan: Why did you decide to start a career in urban farming?
Hilary: I became interested in urban farming while in college. I attended the University of Washington and studied the relationship between environmentalism and urban planning. Urban agriculture seemed like a great tool to connect city dwellers to the natural world, improving their quality of life and providing a tangible way to increase their own environmental sustainability.

Megan: What advice would you give to those who are thinking of trying to grow food?
Hilary: I would encourage beginners to start small and read the instructions. You definitely want to start gardening with a space that you can easily manage, and to be honest with yourself about how much time you can spend in the garden each week. An hour a week is a reasonable amount of time to spend, which means you might want to begin with only a couple of small raised beds. A plant doesn’t have instructions per se, but seed packets and plant tags contain a surprising amount of information, as long as you read it! Beginners who do not heed the advice that accompanies their plants will almost always make mistakes that are easily avoidable! kale

Megan: What is the most difficult part of growing food?
Hilary: It can be challenging for people to accept that, as a farmer, they must deal with the vagaries of nature. Gardening provides a wonderful opportunity to connect to the natural world. However, crops are exposed to a wide range of threats including freezing temperatures, insect pests, fungal diseases, viruses and animals. Therefore, you have to understand that food production will have failures and that to be successful, you simply must persevere and try again!

Megan: What is your greatest learning from helping hundreds of people to start their own gardens?
Hilary: Growing food can be easy. However, it has been remarkable to see how many people make the same mistakes when they are getting started. Honestly, I think people just need to take a little bit of time before they get started to understand the basics. They should take a workshop, read one of our books or spend a few days helping out a friend who is already a gardener. There is a wealth of gardening knowledge out there waiting to be accessed, so get involved in your local community. hilarys-garden

Megan: If you were given a few more hours in the day, what would you choose to do?
Hilary: I could always spend more time taking photographs of the garden. I love being out with the plants first thing in the morning, and a mid-day and in the evening. It is amazing how much can change during the course of a day, and I’d love to have even more opportunities to capture everything that is happening out there.

Megan: What are the top 4 things someone should consider before starting their own garden?
Hilary: A few keys to getting the garden started properly: first, make sure your garden gets great sun exposure (at least 6 to 8 hours). Second, start with a space that is easy to manage (perhaps only a couple of raised beds). Third, use good quality soil and add organic fertilizers to your beds before planting. Lastly, always follow the plant spacing guidelines for each crop and make sure to water your crops regularly! If you do those things, you will almost certainly have a great first gardening season.

Megan: Do you think everyone should grow food?
Hilary: I think that growing food is good for people. Just about everyone would benefit from spending more time outside, getting their hands in the soil and eating more vegetables. Having a garden makes all of these things inevitable, so it’s a very healthy habithilary-and-bush-beans

Megan: If someone can only grow 3 plants? Which ones should they grow and why?
Hilary: Choosing only three plants would be challenging. I think the crops might be different for everyone. One of the things we have learned from working with lots of different gardeners, is that each person has their own tastes and preferences. Some people might only want to plant tomatoes, while another might only want salad greens. If I had to choose only three crops, they would be beets, kale and beans. I’d grow beets simply because they are my favorite vegetable to eat; kale because it has a long season, produces a ton of food from each plant and is very nutrient dense; green beans are also big producers and are easy to store by canning, drying or freezing, so you can eat them year-round. beets

Megan: A lot of people don’t have yards; can they grow edible food on a deck or in pots?
Hilary: You can definitely create an edible garden on a deck or in pots anywhere you have room. Make sure the space gets at least 6 hours of sunlight, make sure you can easily get water to the space so you can irrigate your plants (pots dry out really fast), and make sure to use a potting soil in the containers. Potting soil is essential, because regular garden soil will become compacted and too dense in a container for crops to grow well. There is no such thing as a space that is too small, even growing one pot of basil is a fun gardening project! container-garden

Megan: What is your most favorite edible plant to grow and why?
Hilary: I have too many favorites to choose only one, but I really like growing lettuce. Because lettuce grows really quickly, you can keep replanting it all season long. I plant 3-4 heads of lettuce in the garden every week or two and this means that I can have a salad pretty much any day of the year. Lettuce is a great crop because it is easy to grow, it matures quickly and pretty much every meal benefits from the addition of a salad. salad-greens-in-a-pot

Megan: What is next for you?
Hilary: I am really hoping that our new podcast, Encyclopedia Botanica, will find a nationwide audience. I think there is a need for a down-to-earth edible gardening resource and I love the podcast medium. Podcasts are such an easy way for people to learn and I am just trying to get the word out there so that everyone knows what we are up to.

Helpful gardening resources from Hilary and Seattle Urban Farm Company:

Podcast
Encyclopedia Botanica

Books
Food Grown Right in Your Backyard – a must-have!

High-Yield Vegetable Gardening

Blog 
Seattle Urban Farm Company Blog

Instagram
SeattleUrbanFarmCo

GIVEAWAY!

Last but not least, Hilary and I have teamed up to give away a copy of the must-have book “Food Grown Right, In Your Backyard” by Seattle Urban Farm Company’s Co-Founders!

Giveaway begins Tuesday, November 15, 2016. Check Instagram on Tuesday for details! 
 
To enter for the chance to win:

  1. Follow both SeattleUrbanFarmCo and SeedSproutGarden on Instagram
  2. Leave a comment and tag a friend sharing why you love gardening
  3. Chance to enter giveaway ends Thursday, November 17, 2016 at 11:59pm PST
  4. Winner will be announced on both SeattleUrbanFarmCo and SeedSproutGarden Instagram accounts on Friday, November 18, 2016megan-8

Good luck! While your waiting, listen to the latest episode of Encyclopedia Botanica.

Photography by Hilary Dahl

 

Baby food made easy

The garden has been a source of energy, nutrition, and joy for me and my husband. When we had a baby, it became so much more. It is a place to teach our child about the ecosystem of life, real food, colors, textures, and responsibility. And as our baby begins to eat solid foods, the garden has provided the majority of his nutrients. I can’t think of a better source of food than the fruit and vegetables grown in our own backyard. dsc_0117

You might be thinking, “are you serious?” First, you want me to find the time to make baby food and on top of that, you want me to grow the vegetables and fruits? Of course not! But maybe.. a little bit. How about I provide a few easy baby food recipes for 6+ month olds. Maybe you try these and then realize you can grow most of the vegetables in the recipes and decide to try gardening? Just throwing it out there!

In all reality, I didn’t quite know what foods/recipes to start with for my baby, so below are a few ideas that have worked for us. As to how this relates to gardening? Children are one more reason to try growing food, even a pot of tomatoes. Whether they are babies, toddlers, or teens they can learn from being a part of the gardening experience and hopefully build a love for real food straight from the dirt. dsc_0113

If you are certain that you don’t want an edible garden, sign up for a CSA or head to the Farmer’s Market to gather these vegetables and fruits. Include your child in the experience so that they can develop an appreciation for their food. 

My top 6 baby food recipes for 6+ months

When making baby food, my goal is to make a lot of it at one time. Prep all of the ingredients, and then combine them in different ways to create a variety of purées and finger foods, then store and/or freeze.

Your grocery shopping / garden harvesting list for the following recipes:

1 bunch kale – wash, tear into smaller pieces (remove from stem), steam

2 pears – peel and cut into chunks (no need to steam)

5 large carrots – if organic / from the garden I do not peel, wash, cut into small chunks, steam

1 can white/ great northern beans – wash and drain

1/2 cup lentils (uncooked) – cook in broth (vegetable or chicken or whateverdsc_0107 you have on hand)

1 apple – peel, cut into chunks, steam

2 handfuls of green beans – wash and steam

1 bunch of spinach – wash and steam

2 beets – peel, wash, cut into chunks, and steam

1 banana and/or 1 cup frozen/fresh blueberries – no prep needed

Once you have prepared these items, you can mix and match to create the recipes below. The allocated amount of each ingredient is a rough estimate. Feel free to add however much you want of each of the prepared ingredients above. The below assumes that you have already peeled, washed, steamed, etc.

Carrots, kale, pear purée
½ of the prepared kale 
1 pear
1/2 of the prepared carrots dsc_0100

Lentils, carrots, white bean purée
½ cup lentils
1 can white beans
1/2 of the prepared carrots 

Carrot purée or finger food
If you have leftover carrots, either keep as steamed chunks for baby finger food or purée and add a little cinnamon.

Spinach, apple purée
½ of the prepared spinach
1 apple

Green beans, pear, kale and/or spinach purée
Prepared green beans 
½ to 1 pear
Any remaining kale and/or spinach

Beets, blueberries, banana purée (Beets are recommended for 8+ months)
Prepared beets 
1 banana and/or 1 cup blueberries

Always feel free to add cinnamon, sage, mint and other spices to the purées for some added flavor.

This will make a lot of food, prepare to freeze and store it.

You can easily make these recipes by steaming the fruits and vegetables in a pot and blending them together in any blender. However, if you want to get fancy, I recommend this all-in-one BEABA Babycook – Sorbet baby cooker.

Freezing and storing baby food

When you are first starting solid foods, your child may eat closer to 2 ounces per meal. As you near 8-9 months your child may be eating closer to 4 ounces+ per meal. 

I recommend to have a variety of 2 and 4 ounce storage containers. These OXO Tot containers are great for storing and freezing OXO Tot 12-Piece Baby Blocks Set

dsc_0101

If you do make all of the food above, you will most likely need more containers to freeze the food. In this case, I love these Fresh Baby So Easy Baby Food and Breast Milk Trays

Or of course, just a good ol’ ice cube tray works perfect Kitch Easy Release White Ice Cube Tray, 16 Cube Trays (Pack of 4)

If you use ice cube trays, when the food is frozen, remove it from the trays and put into ziplock bags. Label the bags with the recipe name and date you prepared the food.

When you need the food, put the cubes into a bowl or into reusable food pouches. There are double zippers at the bottom of this pouch, Reusable Food Pouch (6 Pack – Medium) – Easy to Fill and Clean – Double Zipper Means No Leaking – Perfect for Homemade and Organic Baby Food – Suitable for Babies, Toddlers and Kids of All Ages, to insert the frozen food cubes or fill directly with fresh food and then freeze.

Lastly, if you are feeling inspired and want to get a little fancy with your baby food making, check out this cookbook Bébé Gourmet: 100 French-Inspired Baby Food Recipes For Raising an Adventurous Eater

I hope this post gives you a little inspiration to try making your own baby food and even more so, include your child in the food experience. Whether that be growing food, exploring a Farmer’s Market, or cooking together. There is so much to learn from food and it is more fun to enjoy it together!img_4858

Winter squash + pumpkin recipes and planting

Confession: I totally missed the memo on planting winter squash. I was so focused on summer squash, that I wasn’t even thinking about growing my own fall decorations and more importantly, delicious fall and winter food. dsc_0087

So here we are, in the midst of fall and all of its glory. With Halloween right around the corner, pumpkins line patio steps and apartment balconies, and grocery bins are bursting with squash and pumpkins. And I suddenly realize that I want winter squash, of every kind, to line my steps, to spice up my fall decor, and of course, to eat!

Note to self: Plant winter squash and pumpkins (and gourds) next year (you should too). They are easy to grow and inexpensive (but do require some space).

What to plant:

  • Winter squash: acorn, delicata, butternut, and hubbard
  • Pumpkins: for carving and sugar pumpkins for eating
  • Gourds: if you have spacedsc_0086

When to plant: Direct seed in mid May. Winter squash need more time to mature than summer squash. You can also direct seed to grow your own transplants.

Reality check: We are well past May, so the opportunity to grow winter squash has passed, but it is added to the list for next year. The good news! Winter squash and pumpkins are readily available at the Farmer’s Market, Pumpkin Patches, and the grocery store.

NOW, getting to the actual motivation for this post – I encourage you to decorate for fall, Halloween, and Thanksgiving with winter squash and sugar pumpkins. They are beautiful, provide bold color, and the best part, when you are done using them as your autumn flair, you can eat them! So your decorations don’t go to waste. 

I have compiled a list of my favorite recipes that use an array of winter squash varieties and pumpkins. Check these out for some inspiration. 

Recipes for winter squash and pumpkins:dsc_0091

Winter Squash Pancakes with Crispy Sage and Brown Butter from Smitten Kitchen
Squash: you can use any variety
Are you kidding me? Pancakes for dinner?! Really they are for any time of day. Yummy!
Smitten Kitchen is an all time favorite of mine, check out her fabulous cookbook: The Smitten Kitchen Cookbook: Recipes and Wisdom from an Obsessive Home Cook.  

Slow Cooker Butternut Squash + Apple Soup from The Natural Nurturer
Squash: Butternut
Slow cooker? Say no more! Any recipe using my crockpot is worth trying – nothing better than the smell of dinner when you walk in the door after a long day! Not to mention healthy and delicious.
I have been following The Natural Nurturer for her easy, wholesome recipes that are intentionally crafted to be healthy, delicious, and family friendly. Check her out!

Chicken Sausage + Kale Stuffed Squash from Simply Real Health
Squash: Delicata
Not only is this recipe sweet and savory, but it is easy and healthy. Plus, 100% seasonal! I am still growing carrots and kale, and just finished harvesting my zucchini. You can find all of these ingredients at your local Farmer’s Market right now.
Sarah from Simply Real Health is the Queen of healthy, wholesome, tasty recipes that are designed for the seasons, so you can truly eat real food farm to table. Check out her cookbook: The Simply Real Health Cookbook: Easy Real Food Recipes For a Healthy Life, Made Simple.

Roast Pumpkin with Honey and Feta from Not Quite Nigella
Squash: any variety
I love this recipe – so simple and flavorful and you can apply it to any variety of squash or pumpkin.

Warm Winter Kale and Delicata Squash Salad with Maple Vinaigrette from Do You Even Paleo?
Squash: Delicata
Everyone needs a “go to” warm, delicious fall and winter inspired salad. Plus, if you still have kale in the garden, you can use that too!

Classic Baked Acorn Squash from Simple Recipes
Squash: Acorn
So simple and easy and NEVER disappoints. Pairs perfectly with just about anything. Plus, it is even a good leftover! Full of nutrients, regardless of the yummy brown sugar and butter.

Roasted Pumpkin Seeds Six Ways from Wholefully
Pumpkin
Whatever you do, don’t forget to roast your pumpkin seeds. I personally prefer the basic olive oil + salt. But may have to give one of these six other options a try this year!

What are your favorite recipes using winter squash and/or pumpkins? Please share!

And come May 2017, don’t forget to plant your winter squash!

dsc_0097

How to put your garden to bed

Just last weekend, I had the opportunity to take my very first Seattle Tilth veggie gardening class. It was awesome! It really hit me that I truly love gardening, actually love it so much that I get amped up talking about the soil ecosystem. I know I’m excited about something when I actually arrive early, and it did not disappoint.img_5862

I chose to take this class “Put Your Garden to Bed” because I always struggle with actually knowing when to call it quits and how to make the most of my garden during the winter. This class provided a plethora of knowledge, but to keep it simple, check out my key takeaways specific to a garden in the Pacific Northwest.

Soil is everything. I have said it before and I will say it again and again, the health of the soil ecosystem directly correlates to the health of the plants. Healthy soil is full of organisms that convert organic matter and compost into nutrients for plants. It is important to continue to build this ecosystem in the winter months. All of the takeaways listed below are recommended with the end goal of maintaining and building healthy soil through the winter months.

Remove warm season crops, keep cool season crops. This was my biggest question going into the class, which vegetables do I need to finish harvesting and remove and which ones can I continue to grow through the winter months?dsc_0025

  • Remove: warm season crops such as beans, tomatoes, squash, peas, basil, peppers, cucumbers, celery, and onions. These need to be harvested and removed as soon as possible in order to seed a cover crop, garlic, and/or shallots.
  • Keep: cool season crops such as kale, lettuce, leeks, beets, and carrots. These are much easier to keep if you protect with floating row cover or a hoop house + row cover. Also, it is important to continue to harvest these cool season crops and not let them sit in the dirt the entire winter as they could rot due to the increased wetness.

Remove any plants that have disease. If you have a plant with a disease, you need to completely move this plant off site. If you live in the PNW, this means to put it into yard waste and not a compost pile. Take it off the property.

Plant a cover crop. This is the money maker! Remember how “soil is everything”? Cover crops not only protect the soil from the impact of the rain, but they inject organic matter and nutrients into the soil, while also hosting a bacterial ecosystem during months when this can become dormant. The best part, cover crops are so easy to plant!

Like anything, there are a million different types of cover crops for different goals, check out this list. However, to keep it simple, just find a soil builder mix, basically a blend of cover crops, and sprinkle this on your soil. Cover with some dirt, water, and let it grow.

dsc_0035About 4 weeks before you plant your spring vegetable seeds, you need to chop back the cover crops and put them into the soil. Basically, use a shovel to chop them up and turn them into the soil. If possible, cover with a burlap sack so that the cover crops compost faster, injecting an abundance of organic matter and nutrients into the soil. Yay!

Plant garlic, shallots, and fava beans. You can grow a few vegetables in the winter months. You need to get these in the ground now. Check out this post about planting garlic.

Mulch. Your warm season and diseased crops have been removed, your cover crop and garlic, shallots, and/or fava beans are planted. Now, you can add mulch to help keep soil temperatures a little warmer. There are several types of mulch, learn more here. I plan to use straw to protect my cool season crop and garlic. you do not need to use mulch on the cover crops. dsc_0027

There you have it, your checklist for wrapping up the garden season and making the most of your garden during the winter months. It is best to do all of this now, in the month of October. So get to it!

My last takeaway – take a class at Seattle Tilth. From veggie gardening to composting 101 to making herbal salves, there is something for everyone. It is always a good time to learn and try something new.

Check out this Crimson Clover cover crop sprouting between tomato plants. dsc_0032

October garden to-do list

This post is for both active gardeners and those of you that want to start a garden or grow something. As much as we are starting to wrap up the 2016 gardening season, there is still plenty to be harvested, seeded, and prepped for the current season and next season (Spring 2017).

Here is your October checklist (according to my checklist):

  •  Harvest your Fall crop! And remove plants that have been fully harvested. This includes pumpkins and winter squash. I plan to leave leak and carrots in the ground at least through October, if not November. dsc_0031
  • Leave bean and pea roots in the soil. I recently read NOT to remove the entire bean and pea plant after it has been harvested. Cut it down to ground level and leave the roots in the soil to continue to release nitrogen into the soil. Many crops remove nitrogen from the soil, but peas and beans add nitrogen into the soil.
  • Add a floating row cover. To try to extend the fall crop season, add a floating row cover. The picture below is a hoop house + a row cover. I suggest building a hoop house in the winter when you are not competing with vegetables to install the hoops. So for now, try a floating row cover. dsc_0038
  • Plant garlic. Choose the location wisely, as the garlic will grow and live in this location until it is harvested in July. Plant either softneck (stores longer and tends to be what you find at the grocery store) or hardneck (doesn’t store as long, but bigger and richer in flavor and harder to find at a grocery store). Thanks to this Encyclopedia Botanica podcast about Planting Garlic, I have already purchased my garlic seed from my local Farmer’s Market so I am all ready to plant in October. I will grow primarily hardneck because we eat a lot of garlic (so I don’t need to worry about storage) and it is not typically sold at grocery stores. A 1/3 of my total garlic planting will be softneck. For more on planting garlic, check out this postDSC_0037
  • Plant Spring flower bulbs. You can plant tulips, daffodils, hyacinth, ranunculus, lilies, iris, crocus, and more in October. Make note of where you planted your bulbs. I have definitely dug these up a few months later when weeding. Don’t have a yard but have a deck? Then this is for you. You can absolutely grow these bulbs in pots.
  • Plant cover crops. Cover crops can grow in your soil during the winter, adding organic matter and nutrients, and keeping it healthy for next season. You can use clover, fava beans, rye grass, peas, buckwheat and more. If you decide to forego cover crops, be sure to cover your soil in mulch. For more information about cover crops, check out this post by my friend and fellow gardener.
  • Move citrus trees indoors. And any other houseplants that have been outside for the summer. I have a lemon tree that has been living outdoors, as temperatures begin to near low 50s at night, it is important to move indoors.
  • Plant blueberries and fruit trees. In the PNW, you can plant these now or in the Spring. dsc_0008
  • Prune and clean up roses. Of course, only do this after roses have finished blooming. Remove rose leaves on the ground to prevent disease.
  • Lift and divide perennials.  If you want to spread the love of any of your favorite perennials or share them with your friends. This is a great time to lift and divide them while the ground is still warm. Learn more here.

As you can tell, this is a great month to wrap up a fabulous 2016 and already start planting and prepping for 2017.

Important side note: You never have to feel like you need to do all of these things. It is simply a guide to help you decide what you want to do in your garden, yard, or in the pots on your deck.

What is on your checklist to do in the garden in October? Any tips and tricks to share?  

How to use zucchini

It is that time of year and the zucchini is flowing. Do you have a basket full of this bumper crop? Tired of the same old zucchini bread? I think it is time for some inspiration!

Check out my top 3 zucchini recipes, made easy.

#1 Zucchini Ribbons with Almond Pesto from The Smitten Kitchen Cookbook

This is a new family favorite – delish and takes 10 minutes to make. No cooking required. Plus, there is a chance you have all these ingredients sitting in your kitchen right now. DSC_0019

Ingredients
1/2 cup almonds, toasted and cooled – I just bought roasted almonds
1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
1 small garlic clove, peeled and crushed – I added a few more
Pinch of red pepper flakes
2 tablespoons lemon juice
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/3 cup olive oil
2 pounds medium zucchini, trimmed (about 4 medium, thin and longer if you can find them) – I just used a 10″ zucchini
*I added tomatoes because I have a bunch ready to harvest!

Directions 
Grind almonds, Parmesan, garlic and red pepper flakes in a food processor until they are finely chopped. Add the lemon juice, salt and olive oil and pulse a few times until incorporated.

Peel the zucchini with a vegetable peeler and place zucchini ribbons in the dressing-coated bowl. Toss the ribbons gently (your hands work best) attempting to coat the zucchini as evenly as possible. Serve at room temperature.

#2 Zucchini + Egg Muffins from the Simply Real Health Cookbook 

Perfect for entertaining or grabbing breakfast while you run out the door! A great dose of protein and veggies. And once again, you may already have all these ingredients in your kitchen. DSC_0019

Ingredients
10 organic cage-free eggs
1 zucchini, grated or shredded with excess moisture squeezed out (use a paper towel)
1/2 onion, finely chopped
1/4 cup goat cheese, grated parmesan, or other artisan cheese of your choice (optional)
1 tablespoon freshly chopped herbs – I used chives, basil, and parsley straight from the backyard
Sea salt and pepper to taste

Directions 
Preheat oven to 400 degrees fahrenheit. Line a muffin tin with baking cups or grease the pan.

In a bowl, whisk all ingredients together. Pour batter into muffin tins and bake until cooked through for approximately 20 minutes. Broil for the last minute to get a nice brown crust.

#3 Greek Yogurt Zucchini Bread from Sally’s Baking Addiction

I know, I said “the same old zucchini bread recipe”, BUT this is definitely NOT the same old zucchini bread recipe.

It is flavorful (can anyone say orange zest?), moist (greek yogurt to the rescue), and healthy (at least I feel no shame enjoying a couple of slices of this deliciousness).

Check out the recipe here.

A few notes:

  • I highly recommend adding the walnuts and raisins. If you have a sweet tooth, add dark chocolate chips.
  • I did not have agave on hand, so I used 1/2 cup sugar.
  • I used coconut oil and it was perfect.
  • Definitely add the orange zest and don’t be afraid to pile it on.
  • I baked two loaves for 40 minutes on convection bake and they turned out just right.

Go get those zukes out of the garden or gladly accept one offered to you and enjoy every bite.

Extra! Just before sitting down to write this blog post, a friend sent me an email with a bunch of tips and ideas for using zucchini. I guess this is top of mind for everyone?! Check out these helpful articles:

How to turn 11 Zucchini into a Week of Meals 
Put That Cucumber Down – Pickle This Instead 
The Most Flavorful Zucchini is Also the Simplest Make-Ahead Side 

What are you making with your zukes?